Surface roughness rather than surface chemistry essentially affects insect adhesion

England, M. W., Sato, T., Yagihashi, M., Hozumi, A., Gorb, Stanislav and Gorb, E. V. (2016) Surface roughness rather than surface chemistry essentially affects insect adhesion Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, 7 . pp. 1471-1479. DOI 10.3762/bjnano.7.139.

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Abstract

The attachment ability of ladybird beetles Coccinella septempunctata was systematically investigated on eight types of surface, each with different chemical and topographical properties. The results of traction force tests clearly demonstrated that chemical surface properties, such as static/dynamic de-wettability of water and oil caused by specific chemical compositions, had no significant effect on the attachment of the beetles. Surface roughness was found to be the dominant factor, strongly affecting the attachment ability of the beetles.

Document Type: Article
Additional Information: Times Cited: 0 England, Matt W. Sato, Tomoya Yagihashi, Makoto Hozumi, Atsushi Gorb, Stanislav N. Gorb, Elena V.
Research affiliation: Kiel University > Kiel Marine Science
Kiel University
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence
Refereed: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.3762/bjnano.7.139
ISSN: 2190-4286
Projects: Future Ocean
Date Deposited: 18 Mar 2017 11:50
Last Modified: 18 Mar 2017 11:50
URI: http://eprints.uni-kiel.de/id/eprint/36078

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