Crown galls of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) host distinct microbiota

Faist, Hanna, Keller, Alexander, Hentschel, Ute and Deeken, Rosalia (2016) Crown galls of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) host distinct microbiota Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 82 (18). pp. 5542-5552. DOI 10.1128/AEM.01131-16.

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Appl. Environ. Microbiol.-2016-Faist-AEM.01131-16.pdf - Accepted Version
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Text (Infection procedure for in vitro-cultivated grapevine plantlets (Fig. S1), classification of the grapevine-associated microbiota according to the factors sampling site (Table S1), season (Table S2), and crown gall (Table S3), OTU table (Table S4), and R..)
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Abstract

Crown gall disease of grapevine is caused by virulent Agrobacterium strains and establishes a suitable habitat for agrobacteria and potentially, other bacteria. The microbial community associated with grapevine plants has not been investigated with respect to this disease, which frequently results in monetary losses. This study compares the endophytic microbiota of organs from grapevine plants with or without crown gall disease and the surrounding vineyard soil over the growing seasons of one year. Amplicon-based community profiling revealed that the dominating factor causing differences between the grapevine microbiota is the sample site, not the crown gall disease. The soil showed the highest microbial diversity, which decreased with the distance from the soil over the root, graft union of the trunk to the cane. Only the graft union microbiota was significantly affected by crown gall disease. The bacterial community of graft unions without a crown gall hosted transient microbiota with the three most abundant bacterial species changing from season to season. In contrast, graft unions with a crown gall had a higher species richness, which in every season, was dominated by the same three bacterial species (Pseudomonas sp., Enterobacteriaceae sp., and Agrobacterium vitis). For in vitro cultivated grapevine plantlets, A. vitis infection alone was sufficient to cause crown gall disease. Our data show that microbiota in crown galls are more stable over time than graft union microbiota of healthy trunks, and that the microbial community is not essential for crown gall disease outbreak.

Document Type: Article
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB3 Marine Ecology > FB3-MI Marine Microbiology
Refereed: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.1128/AEM.01131-16
ISSN: 0099-2240
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2016 07:34
Last Modified: 03 May 2017 11:17
URI: http://eprints.uni-kiel.de/id/eprint/33890

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