MOPS-1.0: modelling the regulation of the global oceanic nitrogen budget by marine biogeochemical processes

Kriest, Iris and Oschlies, Andreas (2015) MOPS-1.0: modelling the regulation of the global oceanic nitrogen budget by marine biogeochemical processes Geoscientific Model Development, 8 . pp. 2929-2957. DOI 10.5194/gmd-8-2929-2015.

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Abstract

Global models of the oceanic nitrogen cycle are subject to many uncertainties, among them type and form of biogeochemical processes involved in the fixed nitrogen cycle, and the spatial and temporal scales, on which the global nitrogen budget is regulated. We investigate these aspects using a global model of ocean biogeochemistry, that explicitly considers phosphorus and nitrogen, including pelagic denitrification and nitrogen fixation as sink and source terms of fixed nitrogen, respectively. The model explores different parameterizations of organic matter sinking speed, oxidant affinity of oxic and suboxic remineralization, and regulation of nitrogen fixation by temperature and different stoichiometric ratios. Examination of the initial transient behaviour of different model setups initialized from observed tracer distributions reveal changes in simulated nitrogen inventories and fluxes particularly during the first centuries. Millennial timescales have to be resolved in order to bring all biogeochemical and physical processes into a dynamically consistent steady state, for which global patterns of biogeochemical tracers and fluxes are reproduced quite well. Analysis of global properties suggests that particularly particle sinking speed, but also the parameterization of denitrification determines the extent of oxygen minimum zones, global nitrogen fluxes, and hence the oceanic nitrogen inventory. However, the ways and directions, in which different parameterizations of particle sinking, nitrogen fixation and denitrification affect the global diagnostics, are different, suggesting that these may, in principle, be constrained independently from each other. Analysis of the model misfit suggests a particle flux profile close to the one suggested by Martin et al. (1987). Simulated pelagic denitrification best agrees with the lower values between 59 and 84 Tg N yr−1 recently estimated by other authors.

Document Type: Article
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB2 Marine Biogeochemistry > FB2-BM Biogeochemical Modeling
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence > FO-R05
OceanRep > SFB 754
OceanRep > SFB 754 > A2
OceanRep > SFB 754 > B1
Refereed: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.5194/gmd-8-2929-2015
ISSN: 1991-959X
Projects: SFB754
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2015 08:27
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2017 12:44
URI: http://eprints.uni-kiel.de/id/eprint/27675

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