Egg adhesion of the codling moth Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) to various substrates: II. Fruit surfaces of different apple cultivars

Al Bitar, Loris, Gorb, Stanislav, Zebitz, Claus P. W. and Voigt, Dagmar (2014) Egg adhesion of the codling moth Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) to various substrates: II. Fruit surfaces of different apple cultivars Arthropod-Plant Interactions, 8 (1). pp. 57-77.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

In the late growing season of apples, most eggs of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae), of the second and third generations are deposited directly on fruits. The apple fruit surface is densely covered by three-dimensional micro- and nanoprojections, the epicuticular wax crystals, emerging from an underlying wax film. These epicuticular waxes render the apple fruit surface hydrophobic, which could affect the attachment of insect legs and eggs to it. A better survival of the codling moth offspring is expected to be ensured by the selection of suitable oviposition sites by females, as well as by a proper adhesion of deposited eggs to these sites. In this study, we investigated egg adhesion of the codling moth to the fruit surface of different cultivars of the domestic apple, Malus domestica Borkh., by measuring the pull-off force required to detach eggs from fruits. Since surface characteristics may influence insect egg adhesion, the information about morphological and physicochemical properties of the fruit surface is crucial for understanding oviposition site selection by females. In the present study, surface morphology, wettability, and free surface energy of the apple cultivars 'Boskoop', 'Elstar', 'Golden Delicious', 'Jonica', and 'Topaz' were analyzed. Eggs adhered tightly to the fruit surface of all apple cultivars tested: pull-off forces averaged 63.9 mN. These forces are four- to tenfold stronger than those previously measured on adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of the identical apple cultivars. The mechanisms used by the moth to fix its eggs on the waxy surface of apple fruits, and the influence of fruit surface properties on egg glue adhesion are discussed. Furthermore, the results are debated in the context of the oviposition site selection by females, and its role in offspring survival of the second and third generations of the codling moth.

Document Type: Article
Additional Information: Times Cited: 0 0
Research affiliation: OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence > FO-R03
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence > FO-R07
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence > FO-R08
Kiel University > Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences > Institute of Zoology and Zoological Museum
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1872-8855
Projects: Future Ocean
Date Deposited: 30 Mar 2015 11:56
Last Modified: 10 Apr 2017 10:18
URI: http://eprints.uni-kiel.de/id/eprint/27106

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item