Physical properties of a Luvisol for different long-term fertilization treatments: II. Microscale behavior and its relation to the mesoscale

Holthusen, D., Janicke, M., Peth, S. and Horn, Rainer (2012) Physical properties of a Luvisol for different long-term fertilization treatments: II. Microscale behavior and its relation to the mesoscale Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, 175 (1). pp. 14-23.

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Abstract

We determined the impact of different fertilization, namely organic vs. mineral fertilization, on the mesoscale parameter cyclic compressibility as well as on rheology of soil samples as a microscale parameter and how these parameters are related. Therefore, undisturbed samples were taken from a long-term fertilization trial at the Dikop farm near Bonn (Germany) and tested for their mechanical and hydraulic properties. This paper examines the sensitivity of the soil towards cyclic loading (mesoscale) and oscillatory shearing at the microscale by means of an amplitude sweep test and the resulting parameter maximum shear stress. Fertilization increased cyclic compressibility and thus revealed structural weakness of fertilized soil samples, so did shear stress at the microscale. The main reason for this was a decrease in bulk density in the wake of fertilization. However, within the range of fertilized soil samples, the soil structure became less susceptible towards cyclic loading and oscillatory shearing, respectively, the more organic matter the soil contained (equivalent to the fertilization level). This was assumedly caused by enhanced cementation due to organic substances that could partly substitute the direct graingrain contacts generally contributing to soil strength. The similar behavior of cyclic compressibility and maximum shear stress enabled a first approach to relate soil mechanical parameters at the microscale to those at the mesoscale.

Document Type: Article
Additional Information: Univ Kiel, Inst Plant Nutr & Soil Sci, D-24118 Kiel, Germany. Holthusen, D (reprint author), Univ Kiel, Inst Plant Nutr & Soil Sci, Hermann Rodewald Str 2, D-24118 Kiel, Germany. d.holthusen@soils.uni-kiel.de
Keywords: oil strength microstructural stability organic fertilization long-term fertilization trial potassium rheology organic-matter soil compressibility clay potassium stability particles strength stress impact
Research affiliation: ?? agrar ??
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence
ISSN: 1436-8730
Projects: Future Ocean
Date Deposited: 14 May 2014 10:01
Last Modified: 14 May 2014 10:01
URI: http://eprints.uni-kiel.de/id/eprint/24043

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