Antagonistic Coevolution Accelerates the Evolution of Reproductive Isolation inTribolium castaneum

Berenos, Camillo, Schmid-Hempel, Paul and Wegner, K. Mathias (2012) Antagonistic Coevolution Accelerates the Evolution of Reproductive Isolation inTribolium castaneum American Naturalist, 180 (4). pp. 520-528. DOI 10.1086/667589.

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Abstract

The evolution of reproductive isolation among populations is often the result of selective forces. Among those, parasites exert strong selection on host populations and can thus also potentially drive reproductive isolation. This hypothesis has yet to be explicitly tested, and here we set up a multigenerational coevolution experiment to explore this possibility. Five lines of Tribolium castaneum were allowed to coevolve with their natural parasite, Nosema whitei; five paired lines of identical origin were maintained in the absence of parasites. After 17 generations, we measured resistance within and reproductive isolation between all lines. Host lines from the coevolution treatment had considerably higher levels of resistance against N. whitei than their paired host lines, which were maintained in the absence of parasites. Reproductive isolation was greater in the coevolved selection regime and correlated with phenotypic differentiation in parasite resistance between coevolved host lines. This suggests the presence of a selection-driven genetic correlation between offspring number and resistance. Our results show that parasites can be a driving force in the evolution of reproductive isolation and thus potentially speciation.

Document Type: Article
Additional Information: WOS:000308910600012
Keywords: speciation; fecundity; host-parasite coevolution; experimental evolution; RED FLOUR BEETLE; PARASITE NOSEMA-WHITEI; ECOLOGICAL SPECIATION; POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION; MICROSPORIDAN PATHOGEN; GENETIC ARCHITECTURE; NATURAL-SELECTION; PEA APHIDS; HOST; ADAPTATION
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB3 Marine Ecology > FB3-EV Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Fishes
AWI
Refereed: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.1086/667589
ISSN: 0003-0147
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2012 07:15
Last Modified: 25 Apr 2016 07:32
URI: http://eprints.uni-kiel.de/id/eprint/16495

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