Seismic anisotropy and shear-wave splitting in lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks from the Ivrea Zone--experimental and calculated data

Barruol, Guilhem and Kern, Hartmut (1996) Seismic anisotropy and shear-wave splitting in lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks from the Ivrea Zone--experimental and calculated data Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 95 (3-4). pp. 175-194. DOI 10.1016/0031-9201(95)03124-3.

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Abstract

To quantify the relationships between anisotropy, S-wave splitting and tectonics, we determined the seismic properties of lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks outcropping in the Ivrea Zone (Northern Italy). We obtained P- and S-wave seismic velocities by laboratory direct velocity measurements and/or by calculations based on the modal compositions of the rocks, the lattice preferred orientations (LPOs), and the single crystal stiffness coefficients. Measured P- and S-wave velocities (6.0-7.5 km s-1 and 3.6-4.2 km s-1) are typical of the lower crust. The P-wave anisotropy is in the range 0-10%. Shear-wave birefringence is in the range 0.0-0.6 km s-1, with typical values between 0.0 and 0.2 km s-1. In many cases, the birefringence is clearly related to fabric elements (foliation, lineation). Mafic rocks such as anorthosite or pyroxene-bearing gabbros exhibit low P-wave anisotropies ( < 5%) and low shear-wave birefringences (less than 0.1 km s-1). In contrast, the seismic properties of felsic rocks such as biotite-bearing gneisses and mafic rocks such as amphibolites display high Vp anisotropy (10%) and strong birefringence (0.3 km s-1). Biotite and amphibole preferred orientations clearly control seismic anisotropy and particularly shear-wave splitting. In these rocks, maximum splitting is observed in directions parallel to the foliation with the fast split shear wave polarized parallel to the foliation plane. To have an overview of the seismic properties of this lower-crustal section at a broader scale, we calculated from our data the anisotropic seismic properties of several hypothetical samples that are perhaps more representative of the regional anisotropy than each sample individually. For instance, the average lower-crustal sample displays an anisotropy of 5.5% for P waves and a birefringence around 0.14 km s-1 for S waves propagating parallel to the foliation. We observe little splitting for waves propagating at high angle to the foliation.

Document Type: Article
Research affiliation: Kiel University
Refereed: No
DOI etc.: 10.1016/0031-9201(95)03124-3
ISSN: 0031-9201
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2012 09:22
Last Modified: 08 Oct 2012 07:33
URI: http://eprints.uni-kiel.de/id/eprint/15498

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