Genetic relationships of the marine invasive crab parasite Loxothylacus panopaei: an analysis of DNA sequence variation, host specificity, and distributional range

Kruse, Inken, Hare, Matthew P. and Hines, Anson H. (2012) Genetic relationships of the marine invasive crab parasite Loxothylacus panopaei: an analysis of DNA sequence variation, host specificity, and distributional range Biological Invasions, 14 (3). pp. 701-715. DOI 10.1007/s10530-011-0111-y.

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Abstract

Host specificity is a key variable of the niche breath of parasites that can be an important determinant of a parasite’s ability to invade new areas. There is increasing evidence that many parasite species may comprise a variety of genetically variable lineages, which differ in host specificity and geographic range. In this study, we (1) explored the extent of diversity in the invasive parasitic barnacle Loxothylacus panopaei (Rhizocephala) infecting mud crabs (2) examined the geographic origin for the invasive lineage and (3) assessed if further southward spread of the parasite may be impeded. Along the US Atlantic coast, L. panopaei infects different hosts in its invaded range (Chesapeake Bay to north of Cape Canaveral) compared to one portion of the native range in Southeast Florida. This difference was reflected in genetic lineages on two independent loci, mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and nuclear cytochrome c. Both loci were concordant in that they showed one lineage infecting crabs of the genus Panopeus in the native range and one lineage infecting Eurypanopeus depressus and Rhithropanopeus harrisii hosts in the invaded range and in the Gulf of Mexico, thus indicating Gulf of Mexico populations as the most likely source of introduction into Chesapeake Bay. Interestingly, the nuclear marker resolved an additional lineage of parasites infecting panopeid hosts in the native range. All three parasite lineages were well supported, but a decision about species status must await further analyses. Since its introduction in the 1960s, the invasive L. panopaei lineage has expanded its range southward along the US Atlantic coast, now almost reaching the northern limit of native Panopeus-infecting lineages at Cape Canaveral, Florida. We hypothesized that parasite-free E. depressus in Southeast Florida, living in sympatry with infected panopeid populations, might be resistant to infection by the invasive lineage. Our infection experiments rejected this hypothesis, suggesting that any impediment to further southward range expansion might be expected from temperature regimes of the subtropical zoogeographic region south of Cape Canaveral.

Document Type: Article
Keywords: Benthic Ecology; Phylogeography – Mitochondrial introgression – Nuclear DNA – Rhizocephala – Sacculinidae
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB3 Marine Ecology > FB3-EOE-B Experimental Ecology - Benthic Ecology
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence
Refereed: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.1007/s10530-011-0111-y
ISSN: 1387-3547
Projects: Future Ocean
Date Deposited: 24 Oct 2011 13:45
Last Modified: 17 Jun 2016 11:39
URI: http://eprints.uni-kiel.de/id/eprint/12409

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